3D-printed parts ‘could be future of vehicle development’

SEAT’s CUPRA design team has unveiled a new 3D printing production technique that the
manufacturer claims could revolutionise car design in the future.

Using 3D-printed parts to test aspects of design like aerodynamics, performance and styling
could be a game-changer for the industry at large.

Swift and efficient production and testing

Xavi Serra, head of technical development at CUPRA Racing, said: “The main goal is to
have a lot of parts in a short time.”

“We can quickly test a wide variety of designs and furthermore, this technology enables us
to react swiftly to any changes in the design process.”

Engineers have developed new production techniques for CUPRA’s Leon Competicion
racing car, with the model featuring a host of 3D-printed parts, including door mirrors, air
intakes and cooling intakes.

Processing from design to having the item ready to fit to the car can be done is as little as 20
hours, while up to six different components can be produced at the same time. It all means
the trial and testing of new components can be significantly sped up.

Mr Serra concluded: “This technology is and will continue to be key in countless fields to
make the most complex ideas a reality.”

Jenny Smith, Product Manager for Tele-Gence, commented: “Developing new, more efficient
ways to test and develop components in the design phase could make the production of new
models all the faster, as well as helping manufacturer’s to save on cost and time spent in
development.”

Your business can benefit from affordable telematics with no hidden start-up fees or
long-term commitments. Find out how at www.tele-gence.com

VW’s accident-prevention innovation praised by experts

Volkswagen has received a prestigious award for an innovative new safety feature, which it is bringing in on a range of models and is showcased in the all-new Golf.

 

Car2X technology is based on the Wi-Fi p wireless standard, which is specifically tailored to communicate between vehicles, rather than using the mobile phone network.

 

This means blanket coverage wherever possible, with cars up to 800 metres apart being able to directly exchange positioning data.

 

Warnings within fractions of a second

 

Each equipped vehicle will have the ability to warn others of danger within milliseconds, as well as connecting with traffic infrastructure.

 

In tests, safety body Euro NCAP put the system through eight hazardous situations that drivers could find themselves in but that they would not normally have time to react to.

 

In all eight scenarios, Car2X technology was able to successfully warn the driver of hazards, often up to 11 seconds before an impending accident.

 

Euro NCAP has called the new technology “a technical milestone” and gave special recognition to the traffic hazard alert function.

 

The new Golf will be the first European car to come equipped with Car2X as standard, but it is eventually to be rolled out to other brands and manufacturers.

 

Michiel van Ratingen from Euro NCAP said: “This is an exciting area of safety. Volkswagen are to be congratulated for making the technology standard in vehicles selling in high numbers like the Golf.”

 

At present, Car2X is only active at speeds over 80 kilometres per hour, but work is being done to refine it further so it can boost safety in city traffic situations. It will also become improved as more participants connect.

 

Jenny Smith, general manager for Tele-Gence, commented: “This is a great achievement for Volkswagen. It is exciting to think that a new system with the possibility to boost safety levels so much is already being rolled out. We’re looking forward to having a go!”

 

Your business can benefit from affordable telematics with no hidden start-up fees or long-term commitments. Find out how at www.tele-gence.com

 

Future of Transport review could see new tech boost for UK travellers

A review into transport legislation will aim to deliver cleaner, greener, smarter and more
flexible transport solutions for UK travellers in the coming years.

The Future of Transport review is being undertaken by the Department for Transport and
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

 

More efficient use of existing infrastructure

A consultation will now review existing UK transport law in relation to how small
amendments could be made to promote more efficient use of transport infrastructure and
services moving forward.

Announcing the scheme, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps stated: “We are on the cusp of a
transport revolution. Emerging technologies are ripping up the rulebook and changing the
way people and goods move forever.”

“Our groundbreaking Future of Transport programme marks the biggest review of transport
laws in a generation and will pave the way for exciting new transport technology to be tested,
cementing the UK’s position as a world-leading innovator.”

In addition, a £90 million fund has been allocated to support trials for new technologies that
could lead to decarbonisation of transport in many cities up down the country, including
Portsmouth, Southampton, Derby and Nottingham.

Looking to the future of UK transport

Secretary of state for business, energy and industrial strategy and COP26 president Alok
Sharma concluded: “This review could drive down transport emissions by making greener
ways to travel available to more people.”

Indeed, new opportunities to cut carbon output will be pursued in Southampton and
Portsmouth, where trials will be carried out to research the impact of helping motorists to
better plan their journeys through the use of mobile apps.

A series of ‘mobility hubs’ will also be developed in Derby and Nottingham that will aim to
promote an increased use of public transport among travellers with the creation of a new
website that will offer subsidised journeys and simplified payment methods for its users.

Finally, the West of England Combined Authority will pursue how new technologies could
help to bring together people, operators and authorities. It will aim to see how a combined
approach to booking journeys through multiple modes of transport could make lives easier
for travellers.

Jenny Smith, Product Manager for Tele-Gence, commented: “Tweaks to existing legislation
that could help to promote a cleaner, more efficient future for UK travellers could go a long
way towards helping to reduce the nations carbon footprint. The uptake of new innovations
in the way journeys are carried out should bring welcome benefits for all.”

Your business can benefit from affordable telematics with no hidden start-up fees or
long-term commitments. Find out how at www.tele-gence.com

Drivers urged not to get distracted by infotainment systems

In-car infotainment systems are now a major selling point for automotive brands, but a new
study has suggested they could be as bad for distracting drivers as mobile phones.

Road safety charity IAM RoadSmart commissioned research in which motorists were asked to
complete laps on a simulated test route while using either Android Auto or Apple CarPlay, as
well as a lap with no in-car system.

The participants also had to drive while using voice control only and then touch control only as
instructors assessed their capabilities.

 

Significant impairment behind the wheel

It was found that both methods of control significantly distracted the participants, with
touchscreen proving especially dangerous for concentration.

Drivers were unable to keep a safe distance from the car in front, reacted more slowly to outside
stimuli and regularly deviated from their designated lane.

On average, reaction times at motorway speeds increased to as much as five car lengths – and
in one scenario, a motorist took their eyes off the road for 16 seconds.

This meant using an infotainment system while driving could be as bad as texting at the wheel
and even driving under the influence of alcohol or cannabis.

Policy and research director for IAM RoadSmart Neil Greig said he is seriously concerned by
the study’s findings.

“We’re now calling on industry and government to openly test and approve such systems and
develop consistent standards that genuinely help minimise driver distraction,” he added.

Last year, Brake hosted a free webinar on reducing driver distraction for fleet owners, so it may
be that such initiatives need to be scaled up.

Jenny Smith, Product Manager for Tele-Gence, commented: “Infotainment systems are handy
tools, but they should not be used to the detriment of road safety. Set yours up before you head
off and resist the urge to mess with it while you're behind the wheel.”

Your business can benefit from affordable telematics with no hidden start-up fees or
long-term commitments. Find out how at www.tele-gence.com

Drivers urged not to get distracted by infotainment systems

In-car infotainment systems are now a major selling point for automotive brands, but a new study has suggested they could be as bad for distracting drivers as mobile phones.

Road safety charity IAM RoadSmart commissioned research in which motorists were asked to complete laps on a simulated test route while using either Android Auto or Apple CarPlay, as well as a lap with no in-car system.

The participants also had to drive while using voice control only and then touch control only as instructors assessed their capabilities.

Significant impairment behind the wheel

It was found that both methods of control significantly distracted the participants, with touchscreen proving especially dangerous for concentration.

Drivers were unable to keep a safe distance from the car in front, reacted more slowly to outside stimuli and regularly deviated from their designated lane.

On average, reaction times at motorway speeds increased to as much as five car lengths – and in one scenario, a motorist took their eyes off the road for 16 seconds.

This meant using an infotainment system while driving could be as bad as texting at the wheel and even driving under the influence of alcohol or cannabis.

Policy and research director for IAM RoadSmart Neil Greig said he is seriously concerned by the study’s findings.

“We’re now calling on industry and government to openly test and approve such systems and develop consistent standards that genuinely help minimise driver distraction,” he added.

Last year, Brake hosted a free webinar on reducing driver distraction for fleet owners, so it may be that such initiatives need to be scaled up.

Jenny Smith, general manager for Tele-Gence, commented: “Infotainment systems are handy tools, but they should not be used to the detriment of road safety. Set yours up before you head off and resist the urge to mess with it while you’re behind the wheel.”

 

Your business can benefit from affordable telematics with no hidden start-up fees or long-term commitments. Find out how at www.tele-gence.com