Glasgow’s roads closed for Fast and Furious filming

Glasgow’s roads closed for Fast and Furious filming

Motorists in Glasgow will have to put up with a series of road closures for the rest of October – all for the sake of Hollywood and undiluted movie magic.

A crew of 200 people will be involved in the production of the movie – a spin-off of the Fast and Furious franchise – when shooting takes place in the centre of Glasgow from October 24th-29th, the BBC reports.

Glasgow City Council has revealed which roads will be affected by filming and when – the full list can be found a bit further down.

A statement from the city council read: "All vehicles will be prohibited, waiting, loading and unloading will also be prohibited, except vehicles there in connection with the filming, which have been given permission by the Glasgow City Council Traffic and Road Safety."

The spin-off film will star some of the biggest names linked to the Fast and Furious series over time, such as Jason Statham and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson, as well as newcomers to the franchise such as Idris Elba and Eddie Marsan.  

Currently, the film only has a working title of ‘Hobbs & Shaw’ – a reference to the characters played by The Rock and Luke Evans – and is on track to hit cinema screens around August 2019.

Glasgow was used as a filming location for Fast and Furious 6 in 2012, but none of the stars came to the city.

Ellie Baker, brand manager at FCS Scotland, commented: “It’s fantastic that Hollywood has come to town and hopefully, the times of the road closures shouldn’t cause too much disruption for motorists.”

Full list of Glasgow road closures and times:

From 04:00 on Tuesday 23 October until 23:59 on Friday 26 October

  • Brunswick Street for its full length
  • Cochrane Street for its full length
  • George Square (east side) for its full length
  • George Square (north side) between North Hanover Street and North Frederick Street
  • George Square (south side) for its full length
  • George Street between George Square and Montrose Street
  • Hanover Street for its full length
  • Ingram Street between Glassford Street and Albion Street
  • John Street for its full length
  • Martha Street for its full length
  • Montrose Street between George Street and Ingram Street
  • North Frederick Street for its full length
  • South Frederick Street for its full length

From 10:00 until 16:00 on Wednesday 24 October, and from 10:00 until 16:00 on Thursday 25 October

Roads subject to short term stop and hold during filming:

  • Glassford Street between Ingram Street and Wilson Street
  • Ingram Street between Queen Street and Albion Street
  • Virginia Place for its full length
  • Miller Street at the junction with Ingram Street

From 10:00 until 16:00 on Friday 26 October

  • Glassford Street between Ingram Street and Wilson Street
  • Ingram Street between Queen Street and Albion Street
  • Virginia Place for its full length
  • Miller Street at the junction with Ingram Street

From 04:00 on Tuesday 23 October until 16:00 on Monday 29 October

  • Brunswick Street between Trongate and Wilson Street

From 00:01 on Saturday 27 October until 23:59 on Monday 29 October

  • George Square (east side) for its full length
  • George Square (north side) between George Street and North Frederick Street (subject to short term stop and hold only)
  • George Square (south side) for its full length
  • George Square (west side) for its full length (subject to short term stop and hold only)
  • North Hanover Street between Cathedral Street and George Square (subject to short term stop and hold only)
  • Hanover Street for its full length
  • South Frederick Street for its full length
  • George Street between North Frederick Street to Montrose Street
  • John Street between George Street and Ingram Street
  • Montrose Street between George Street and Ingram Street
  • Cochrane Street for its full length

From 02:00 until 23:00 on Sunday 28 October

  • St Vincent Place for its full length
  • St Vincent Street between St Vincent Place and Blythswood Street
  • George Square (south side) for its full length
  • George Square (east side) for its full length
  • George Square (west side) for its full length
  • Cochrane Street for its full length
  • Hanover Street for its full length
  • Queen Street between Ingram Street and George Street
  • John Street between George Street and Ingram Street
  • Montrose Street between George Street and Ingram Street
  • George Street between North Frederick Street and Montrose Street
  • Anchor Lane for its full length
  • North Court for its full length
  • North Court Lane for its full length
  • South Frederick Street for its full length
  • West Nile Street between Drury Street and West George Street
  • Renfield Street West George Street and Drury Street
  • Hope Street between Bothwell Street and West George Street
  • Wellington Street between West George Street and Bothwell Street
  • West Campbell Street between Bothwell Street and West George Street

From 04:00 on Friday 26 October until 23:59 on Saturday 27 October

  • North Street between Anderston Quay and Argyle Street
  • Newton Street between Argyle Street and Anderston Quay
  • Waterloo Street between Douglas Street and Pitt Street
  • Suspension of bus lane/taxi lane. Can be used by all vehicles
  • North Hanover Street between George Square and Cathedral Street (suspension of Bus Lane)
Photo: South_agency/iStock

2014’s drink-drive limit drop didn’t deliver anticipated road safety improvements

Lowering the drink-drive limit in Scotland has had little effect on bringing down the number of deaths and accidents on the nation’s roads.

That’s according to a study from the University of Strathclyde.

It found that the lower limit for blood alcohol content (BAC) had not sparked a significant drop in road fatalities, notably in the death rate of drivers aged 16-25, who are seen as one of the highest-risk groups for drink-driving.

Researchers from Strathclyde’s Department of Economics insisted they are not suggesting that previous BAC limit reductions had not been effective, only that the most recent revision failed to produce a material impact on road safety.

The latest BAC limit change came into effect in Scotland in 2014, dropping from 0.08mg to 0.05mg per 100ml of blood.

Researchers looked at more than 1.1 million accidents between 2009 and 2016, which resulted in 1.5 million casualties and more than 14,000 fatalities collectively.

In the two years leading up to the lower BAC limit, Scotland had monthly accident rates of 740.63 and fatality rates of 14.96.

In the two years after the new limit’s introduction, the rates were 704.13 for accidents and 15.25 for fatalities. This was the case in England and Wales too, where the drink-drive limits had been unchanged.

A statement from the researchers suggested that this latest BAC limit reduction had “not achieved all that might have been hoped for it in terms of road safety”.

It added: “While there may be other reasons to pursue a reduction in the BAC limits, our results indicate that the marginal returns to further BAC reductions in terms of road safety are small, which is a result that policy makers should take into account when weighing the costs and benefits of alcohol-control policies.”

Ellie Baker, brand manager at FCS Scotland, commented: “It’s a shame that numbers haven’t been dropped as much as expected but that’s not to say that the approach hasn’t paid off in the past.”

Photo: South_agency/iStock

Photo: Brian Clark/Flickr

Online survey invites views on the future of south-west Scotland’s roads

How do you think roads in south-west Scotland could be improved over the next 20 years?

That’s the main question leading a new online public survey launched by Transport Scotland.

The authority is keen to hear views and ideas from people living or working in the south-west of Scotland on how to solve problems or fulfil opportunities associated with the region’s transport network as it begins the process of planning transport investment for the next two decades.

Michael Matheson, cabinet secretary for transport, infrastructure and connectivity, believes the study should get to the heart of how transport affects the lives of everyone living, working or travelling through south-west Scotland.

“Engaging with transport users including the public is an important part of this study and the online survey is a great opportunity for people to put their views across,” he said.

One area of focus for the study is how improvements can be carried out to road, rail, public transport and active travel on key strategic corridors including those served by the A75, A76, A77 and A701.

Mr Matheson added: “It will identify a range of options for improving transport that can be considered as part of the second Strategic Transport Projects Review which will look at future transport infrastructure projects for the whole of Scotland.”

The online survey can be found at https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/South-West-Scotland-Transport-Study and is open until November 14th.

Ellie Baker, brand manager at FCS Scotland, comments: “Company car drivers in south-west Scotland are likely to have strong views on the area’s roads – this is the perfect chance to have those opinions heard.”

Photo: Brian Clark/Flickr

 

Scotland’s first dedicated design museum opens with Jaguar clay model

Scotland’s first dedicated design museum opens with Jaguar clay model

Jaguar has chosen Scotland’s first dedicated design museum to display a bespoke full-size clay model of the brand’s I-Pace electric SUV.

Created by world-renowned designer Ian Callum, the model took centre stage at the grand opening of the new V&A Design Museum in Dundee on September 15th, highlighting the global achievements of Scottish designers past and present.

Jaguar says the clay model demonstrates the painstaking and elaborate design process behind the steps followed to create every new Jaguar.

Ian Callum, Jaguar’s design director, said: “Automotive design is hugely complex. Although much of the design is done digitally, clay models are still important – they are our first chance to see the car in reality.

“As a child, l was inspired to become a car designer at Jaguar and have been lucky enough to live out that dream.”

He went on to acknowledge Scotland’s long history of design excellence and hailed the V&A Dundee as a fantastic opportunity to showcase this on a global stage.

“It has been an honour as a Scot to be involved with the opening of the new museum, and I hope our I-Pace exhibit can help inspire the next generation of design talent,” Mr Callum added.

Away from cars, the new museum will bring touring exhibitions from other international museums to Scotland, as well as curate its own exhibitions.

Ellie Baker, brand manager at FCS Scotland, comments: “It’s an honour for Jaguar to bring such a fascinating and intriguing exhibit to Scotland’s first design museum.”